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This is one of our favorites of the new pages that we added to the second edition of Post-Car Adventuring the SF Bay Area.  County bus systems are literally invisible in the sense that often-extensive transit connections in rural counties do not show up on any large-scale geographical maps, so you either have to life in a given county and see them with your own eyes or you have to do some sleuthing.  And they often take a little, sometimes a lot, of digging to find.  This card is just the tip of the iceberg in terms of what we envision for making these systems much more visible and accessible for regional post-car travelers.  Wouldn’t it be great if there were a AAA-style atlas widely available for such transit connections, so that one could have an atlas for the entire state that showed main trunk lines like Amtrak California’s San Joaquin, Capitol Corridor and Surfliner with all of the many local and regional connecting buses that radiate out from them, along with bike routes á la the Krebs cycle maps?.  The closest thing we have right now to such a resource is Amtrak California’s map that shows their system of trains and thruway buses.  This is a great resource but leaves much of the state looking as if it were inaccessible by public transit—it’s not.  We’d like to do better, though it won’t be easy. 
If you’re a cartographer or have expertise to share that would be useful for such a project and would like to join our transit-atlas project team, we’d love to hear from you.  There’s an imaginary corner office at Post-Car HQ with your name on it.

This is one of our favorites of the new pages that we added to the second edition of Post-Car Adventuring the SF Bay Area.  County bus systems are literally invisible in the sense that often-extensive transit connections in rural counties do not show up on any large-scale geographical maps, so you either have to life in a given county and see them with your own eyes or you have to do some sleuthing.  And they often take a little, sometimes a lot, of digging to find. 

This card is just the tip of the iceberg in terms of what we envision for making these systems much more visible and accessible for regional post-car travelers.  Wouldn’t it be great if there were a AAA-style atlas widely available for such transit connections, so that one could have an atlas for the entire state that showed main trunk lines like Amtrak California’s San Joaquin, Capitol Corridor and Surfliner with all of the many local and regional connecting buses that radiate out from them, along with bike routes á la the Krebs cycle maps?.  The closest thing we have right now to such a resource is Amtrak California’s map that shows their system of trains and thruway buses.  This is a great resource but leaves much of the state looking as if it were inaccessible by public transit—it’s not.  We’d like to do better, though it won’t be easy. 

If you’re a cartographer or have expertise to share that would be useful for such a project and would like to join our transit-atlas project team, we’d love to hear from you.  There’s an imaginary corner office at Post-Car HQ with your name on it.

— 3 years ago